Amanda

Write a post about undergraduate DH (how it should be taught; what guidelines or restrictions; experience, etc.)

How:

  • By a professor with significant experience in the DH field – willing to bring in experts (guest speakers & lecturers are phenomenal assets) to cover the topics they are not qualified experts in
  • A small classroom (NOT INTENDED FOR A MASS LECTURE SETTING) where a tight community feeling can be easily and quickly established
  • Around technology and computers (clearly a necessity)

Guidelines/Restrictions:

  • 300 level course – that type of dedication, intuition, seriousness is needed to really get what one can out of this course
  • In my personal opinion, THIS SHOULD BE A REQUIRED COURSE FOR GRADUATION FOR EDUCATION MAJORS OF EVERY DISCIPLINE (and I will explain why later)
  • Students, in some way, shape or form, should have some collective project to contribute to the developing field
  • Definitions/Topics/People that need to be covered and studied: XML, TEI, Collaboration, Digital Nation, Transcribing, Transcribe Bentham, Clay Shirky, Sherry Turkle, Mark Bauerlein, John Unsworth.

Experience/Reasons why:

  • We live in a digital age. As I’ve quoted Bob before, the times they are a’changing. We have an obligation to ourselves, to our society, to our existence to examine these changes, their effects. That’s really what we’ve tried to do this entire semester – weigh the pros and cons of this change – its implications (what else is changing? what’s causing this change?), what we’re loosing (printed text? or more? [Turkle]), what we’re gaining (collaborative work?), what we don’t know yet (thanks, Shirky). We’ve read statistics and heard personal accounts. We’ve studied writing, in implementation, in incremental changes and fundamental ones. We’ve been behaviorists, psychologists as we’ve looked at why and how we use the internet the way we do. Who wouldn’t benefit from taking a step back and looking at technology (how we rely on it, what we do with it, what it’s doing with/to us) and learn from that? Question, maybe, all of the above? DH makes us do that. This course was not, and is not, just about ‘going digital’ or how to go digital – it’s about really focusing on what that means for the humanities and how to make the humanities that way.
  • DH is a new field. It needs new ideas, new input, fresh blood – and who better to give it, than those natives who are the experts in this field, yet old enough to be mature, insightful, educated and honest – undergraduate students. Plain and simple.
  • As an education major, this course has opened my eyes to the capabilities the internet/technology have that I can exploit in the classroom. A different way of thinking, of utilizing to the highest ordered thinking power, that I never got in my “Educational Computing” course. If my [future] students are natives, which they will be, I need to accommodate to their needs and to what they know. I need to study DH. I need to be prepared to deal with why they rely on it the way they do, why they use it, what they use it for, what they can use it for. And I need to teach them that. And DH teaches me that.

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