Final Exam

1. Technology has created a society constantly in a state of transition. With each new generation comes new natives and new immigrants, those familiar and those unfamiliar. Today digital natives and digital immigrants are facing evident changes. The way we gather information is changing. The way we interact is changing. The rate at which we do things is changing. All of this is a result of technology. Digital Humanities gives us the chance to explore the implications of these changes on society as a whole.

2. The fundamentals of learning and knowledge have indeed changed and continue to evolve each day. We are not the “Dumbest Generation,” rather a generation with a new set of skills. We are not less intelligent; we simply use knowledge and learn information differently than digital immigrants are used to. Today we need collaboration not lectures; we need to learn concepts not singular facts; we need networking and socialization not isolation; we need interactive learning not sit back and listen. We need new outcome objectives not standardized tests. The immigrants ultimately need to accept this change, for the digital natives have fundamentally changed. We should harness this change and seek its full potential.

Erik Kile:

“…would the Internet as ‘the communicative backbone of real intellectual and civic change’ become a reality sooner if Digital Humanists [STUDENTS] become more vocal about their work? It’s an exciting field, there’s no denying that.”  This is the question that Schlitz turned back at us on our last day of discussion. She ended the last discussion of the semester with this.  That means it’s important.  That means she cares about our opinions and believes that other people do, too.  Natalie started us off strong and I wouldn’t change a thing about her second point, that (not-so)modern-day centralized learning is inconsistent and resistant to our collaborative internet culture: it’s exactly the sort of thing the digital immigrants need to hear from us.  Allow me to try my hand at it…

1. The students in this class were born in a transitional stage: we have proved to be pretty adept in all things digital, but we were heavily influenced by the aging technology of our parents and grandparents.  With the technological advancements that occur every day (and will continue to occur into the future), we can’t imagine the digital landscape that the babies of 2010 will be growing up in.  Should we be worried for them?  No, of course not.  “Every generation has faced new technology and thought that their children would be profoundly affected…just because they may experience childhood through a different medium, they will still experience childhood and gain crucial experiences necessary to become an adult” [quote from Katrina at the bottom of my post, “Digital Literature (and more Cute Babies)”, here].  The format of a children’s book, for instance, won’t really alter the effect of a masterful storyteller.  Children will still roar like the Wild Things and get lost in Seuss’ colorful landscapes regardless of how they are delivered.  “People will always crave entertainment, just in new forms, new mediums” [Natalie’s comment – same post] — “And I think that no matter how technology changes, literature will go with it [Jordyn’s comment – you get the idea].

Time involved with looking through all my previous posts, including all comments: ~2 hours. Time spent authoring the above paragraph: 10 minutes.  Time spent studying for the average final: every waking moment of the upcoming weekend.  Please, we have a unique opportunity here!  Any attempt at contribution is a good one.  Add to my paragraph if you think I’m missing anything (preferably in another color, so your additions/changes don’t go unnoticed).

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Grace—my favorite quote from my writings this semester…

“it provides not only access, but insight”.  To me, the ever changing field of Digital Humanities is unique in that it is giving us new ways to view something that we have seen before.  As we have demonstrated in our final projects, we can give easy access to classic works or subjects, but we can also present them in a new way.  Also, with the vast options that the internet provides, we can supplement the works we provide with other features that can offer interactivity or a unique learning experience.

Digital Humanities is learning and accepting the digital ways of our world, and putting them to use, to form innovations so great, they can better not only the humanities, but the world.It is about learning what everyone has to offer, and using these offerings as tools to expand research possibilities.  I think Digital Humanities is pertinent and is extremely necessary for molding students into citizens who can do more than survive in this digital world; they can use this digital world to create, teach, and enlighten.

I believe that teaching Digital Humanities to undergraduate students is critically important. Today’s college undergrads are part of a unique, new generation.  We have been immersed in this new climate every day, surrounded by the digitization of the world, and yet most students probably know very little about the actual study of Digital Humanities.  makes scholarly work more attractive.  so little is being done to truly integrate technology into new teaching and learning practices.  Teaching Digital Humanities to undergrads can be beneficial because it gives insight into how the onset of technology has changed our world, and how we can change with it.

Though learning Digital Humanities does not need, as a goal, to turn its students into scholars, it can prompt them to make their work a little more worthwhile. The study of humanities is truly an art form, and if this practice is not passed on to the next generation, using the new tools that we are accustomed to and can use easily, the art form will be lost.

It is therefore baffling as to why the concepts of DH are not taught at the undergraduate level.  To say that the the ability of DH thrive lies in those that were born and raised in a digital age, is is foolish to wait for them to come into h as older students. To reach out to the youthfulness of undergraduate students would be like reaching into a goldmine of creativity and ideas. These ideas are often times looked as wasted upon useless online forums and social networks, even calling this generation the “dumbest”. I ask then, why do we not inform and educate ignorant minds of the ways that the internet can be used to further their own knowledge?  the course would need to inform the students of what DH really is, letting them define if for themselves. It would also be important to not scare the students away with too much technical specifics. It would be best to look at this class as a introductory course that would allow a little dip into each pond of knowledge in the field of DH.  Who to be more interested in the flaws of how they are learning than those that are paying money to learn.

How could Digital Humanities have evaded me after eighteen years of immersing myself in not only the humanities, but also technology?  How is it that, in the era of digital communication, so few digital natives have been introduced to this field?  Why is the body of work  that defines digital humanities made up of pieces written by individuals who are immigrants to this age?

The whole class collaborates and interacts. EVERYONE’S opinion matters and all inquiries are valid.

If we, the digital natives, don’t want to be known as the “Dumbest Generation,” we need to harness this fundamental shift in our learning styles and knowledge. We need to show the digital immigrants that “our way” is just as good as the “old way.”DH opened my eyes to these implications of technology.This course exposed me to the effects of the digital world in my life and society in general. I learned that we are not less intelligent; we simply use knowledge and learn information differently than digital immigrants are used to. Today we need collaboration not lectures; we need to learn concepts not singular facts; we need networking and socialization not isolation; we need interactive learning not sit back and listen. We need new outcome objects not standardized tests.The immigrants ultimately need to accept this change, for the digital natives have fundamentally changed. We should harness this change and seek its full potential.

Technology can both inhibit and facilitate the learning process for kids our age.  It can serve as a tool for intellectual assignments, or as a distraction, which gave us the title of “the Dumbest Generation.”

DH has changed me. It has made things real to me that I knew were out there, but I never really examined closely.

  • By a professor with significant experience in the DH field – willing to bring in experts (guest speakers & lecturers are phenomenal assets) to cover the topics they are not qualified experts in
  • A small classroom (NOT INTENDED FOR A MASS LECTURE SETTING) where a tight community feeling can be easily and quickly established
  • Around technology and computers (clearly a necessity)

Guidelines/Restrictions:

  • In my personal opinion, THIS SHOULD BE A REQUIRED COURSE FOR GRADUATION FOR EDUCATION MAJORS OF EVERY DISCIPLINE (and I will explain why later)
  • Students, in some way, shape or form, should have some collective project to contribute to the developing field
  • Definitions/Topics/People that need to be covered and studied: XML, TEI, Collaboration, Digital Nation, Transcribing, Transcribe Bentham, Clay Shirky, Sherry Turkle, Mark Bauerlein, John Unsworth.
  • DH is a new field. It needs new ideas, new input, fresh blood – and who better to give it, than those natives who are the experts in this field, yet old enough to be mature, insightful, educated and honest – undergraduate students. Plain and simple

We can safely assume that a majority of the population does not know what DH is as well.  In order for this subject to gain the support it needs, it needs to be known.  People need to talk about it, be informed about it, and learn about it.Should any undergrad be able to take this class?  I believe that the answer is yes.  If, as in the case of our class, only honors students are allowed to take the class, a portion of the educated population will miss out on this important issue.

XML, copyright, text analysis, Google analytics, incorporation of visualizations, crowdsourcingIf DH takes a motivated person to study it and not all of the general public studying DH is motivated, then not all of the general public should study it.meet a gpa requirement (maybe a 2.5-4.0). n addition the professor must be open to changes in the syllabus.

The introduction of DH to students should be gradual. Elementary students should be using deliverables. Technology should be a component of their education. High school students should be made aware of the significance of good resources – separating things like the Perseus Project (real DH) from something akin to this (charlatan.)DH is undoubtedly deserving of study, but it cannot support itself as a department / major / occupation.The field is entirely interdisciplinary. We need to collaborate to make DH. DH can exist solely as an interdisciplinary department.The number of straight DH classes should be minimal. Maybe an introductory course like this one, some more focused seminars. Mostly, however, DH should be a component of every single department.

very important that they have a “clear-ish” idea of what the class entails so they aren’t taken by complete surprise. Digital Humanities is still developing as an undertaking and they will be helping to expand and even maybe pioneer this at the undergraduate level.Students earlier than undergraduate study should have contact with different types of digital humanities so they can start to form new ideas but they aren’t ready yet to really comprehend the subject matter.When students take DH they need to understand they will not just be using technology but trying to understand the implications of technology on our society.They have to be expected to collaborate to make projects and fully embrace everything DH has to offer.

In fact, I think it’s safe to say that as Digital Natives, we are unconsciously gaining skills every single day that may be utilized in the promotion of Digital Humanities.  So why aren’t we?  ”We want them to grow up and to blow us away…but we just don’t see it happening,” says Mr. Bauerlein in this video from the PBS special, Digital Nation.  We’ve read and heard enough statistics to know that he’s not just making this up.  But what exactly are we doing wrong?  I’d like to argue that we haven’t done anything wrong; we’ve simply been misguided.It isn’t a question — we need a pedagogical shift. And who better to lead the charge than us?we actually do have the power to take control of a flawed system and shape the future.We’ve proven ourselves (in this class, at least) capable of being innovative, creative thinkers.  We just need to be given the chance to show that in an environment that promotes it.Rather than fussing over a definition of DH, why not kick back and embrace its multifarious nature?Because it’s different for everyone.  The science major approaches things differently than the literature major — this diversity is a necessity to the field of Digital Humanities.  I’m thinking back to our group research project.  John and I were interested in Beat Literature and chose that as our starting point.  When we mentioned to Chemistry Kenneth that the Beats were wont to experiment with various drugs, he and Derek took our project somewhere that John and I never could have imagined because we just don’t have that sort of knowledge.  Using a mass spectronomy spectomotron spectrometer to look for traces of drugs of the actual manuscripts?  Blew my mind.  The rest is history.Why not, then, split it up into a couple different classes, making the DH basics and concepts the requirements. I firmly believe that, given the opportunity, my peers at the undergraduate level could not help but find the field of Digital Humanities to be an engaging one.  The tools are right in front of us every minute of every day.  How can we prove our skills and creativity unless we’re given the chance to? I am by no means an expert, but my first-hand experience tells me that change needs to come quickly.

——————————————————————

**Organized in paragraphs, without the numbered list:

How could Digital Humanities have evaded me after eighteen years of immersing myself in not only the humanities, but also technology?  How is it that, in the era of digital communication, so few digital natives have been introduced to this field?  Why is the body of work  that defines digital humanities made up of pieces written by individuals who are immigrants to this age? Technology can both inhibit and facilitate the learning process for kids our age.  It can serve as a tool for intellectual assignments, or as a distraction, which gave us the title of “the Dumbest Generation.”

If we, the digital natives, don’t want to be known as the “Dumbest Generation,” we need to harness this fundamental shift in our learning styles and knowledge. We need to show the digital immigrants that “our way” is just as good as the “old way.”DH opened my eyes to these implications of technology.This course exposed me to the effects of the digital world in my life and society in general. I learned that we are not less intelligent; we simply use knowledge and learn information differently than digital immigrants are used to. Today we need collaboration not lectures; we need to learn concepts not singular facts; we need networking and socialization not isolation; we need interactive learning not sit back and listen. We need new outcome objects not standardized tests.The immigrants ultimately need to accept this change, for the digital natives have fundamentally changed. We should harness this change and seek its full potential.

Digital Humanities is learning and accepting the digital ways of our world, and putting them to use, to form innovations so great, they can better not only the humanities, but the world.It is about learning what everyone has to offer, and using these offerings as tools to expand research possibilities.  I think Digital Humanities is pertinent and is extremely necessary for molding students into citizens who can do more than survive in this digital world; they can use this digital world to create, teach, and enlighten. DH has changed me. It has made things real to me that I knew were out there, but I never really examined closely.

It is therefore baffling as to why the concepts of DH are not taught at the undergraduate level.  To say that the the ability of DH thrive lies in those that were born and raised in a digital age, is is foolish to wait for them to come into h as older students. To reach out to the youthfulness of undergraduate students would be like reaching into a goldmine of creativity and ideas. These ideas are often times looked as wasted upon useless online forums and social networks, even calling this generation the “dumbest”. I ask then, why do we not inform and educate ignorant minds of the ways that the internet can be used to further their own knowledge?  the course would need to inform the students of what DH really is, letting them define if for themselves. It would also be important to not scare the students away with too much technical specifics. It would be best to look at this class as a introductory course that would allow a little dip into each pond of knowledge in the field of DH.  Who to be more interested in the flaws of how they are learning than those that are paying money to learn.

I believe that teaching Digital Humanities to undergraduate students is critically important. Today’s college undergrads are part of a unique, new generation.  We have been immersed in this new climate every day, surrounded by the digitization of the world, and yet most students probably know very little about the actual study of Digital Humanities.  makes scholarly work more attractive.  so little is being done to truly integrate technology into new teaching and learning practices.  Teaching Digital Humanities to undergrads can be beneficial because it gives insight into how the onset of technology has changed our world, and how we can change with it. Though learning Digital Humanities does not need, as a goal, to turn its students into scholars, it can prompt them to make their work a little more worthwhile. The whole class collaborates and interacts. EVERYONE’S opinion matters and all inquiries are valid. The study of humanities is truly an art form, and if this practice is not passed on to the next generation, using the new tools that we are accustomed to and can use easily, the art form will be lost.

CONCLUSION:

As we said before, Digital Humanities is about not only learning and accepting the digital ways of our world, but also about how to apply these strategies to our education. From our DH class, we found that DH isn’t just one thing. It’s not a fact or a definition one can memorize. It’s not something that can be understood in 5 minutes- or even 5 weeks. It’s something that is on a completely different level than any other subject or idea. It’s real. It’s relatable. It’s understandable. It’s intellectual. It’s sophisticated. It’s essential. If we could take all of these thoughts and ideas from a course we were so unsure of in the beginning, imagine what college students in the future could glean from Digital Humanities.

Our full story is chronicled on our class blog (stephanieschlitz.com/dh) for all to see. Hopefully, this poses an example for other universities to integrate a course such as this one into their cirriculum.

Photo Album

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We are a group of fourteen undergraduate students at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, enrolled in an Honors course – Introduction to Digital Humanities. As our final, in fitting with the themes that we have studied, we have been inspired (and, thankfully, allowed) to draft, for the 4Humanities project, a manifesto.

Undergraduates should be learning about DH. Digital Humanities is learning and accepting the digital ways of our world, and putting them to use, to form innovations so great, they can better not only the humanities, but the world.

How could Digital Humanities have evaded us after two decades of immersing ourselves in not only the humanities, but also technology?  How is it that, in the era of digital communication, so few digital natives have been introduced to this field?  Why is the body of work that defines digital humanities made up of pieces written by individuals who are immigrants to this age? We appreciate and respect immigrants’ contributions, but natives have the perspective – we need to take over. “We want them to grow up and to blow us away […] but we just don’t see it happening,” says Mr. Bauerlein in this video from the PBS special, Digital Nation. We’ve read and heard enough statistics to know that he’s not just making this up.  But what exactly are we doing wrong?  We’d like to argue that we haven’t done anything wrong; we’ve simply been misguided.

Technology can both inhibit and facilitate the learning process for kids our age.  It can serve as a tool for intellectual assignments, or as a distraction, which gave us the title of “Dumbest Generation.” If we, the digital natives, don’t want to be known as this, we need to harness this fundamental shift in our learning styles and knowledge. We need to show the digital immigrants that “our way” is just as good as the “old way.” DH opened our eyes to these implications of technology. This course exposed us to the effects of the digital world in my life and society in general. We learned that we are not less intelligent; we simply use knowledge and learn information differently than digital immigrants are used to. Today we need collaboration not lectures; we need to learn concepts not singular facts; we need networking and socialization not isolation; we need interactive learning not sit back and listen. We need new outcome objects not standardized tests. The immigrants ultimately need to accept this change, for the digital natives have fundamentally changed. We should harness this change and seek its full potential.

DH is about learning what everyone has to offer, and using these offerings as tools to expand research possibilities.  We feel Digital Humanities is pertinent and is extremely necessary for molding students into citizens who can do more than survive in this digital world; they can use this digital world to create, teach, and enlighten. DH has changed us. It has made things real to us that we knew were out there, but never really examined closely.

It is therefore baffling as to why the concepts of DH are not taught at the undergraduate level.  To say that the ability of DH to thrive lies in those that were born and raised in a digital age, it is foolish to wait for them to come into DH as older students. To reach out to the youthfulness of undergraduate students would be like reaching into a goldmine of creativity and ideas. These ideas are often times looked as wasted upon useless online forums and social networks, even calling this generation the “Dumbest”. A question then: why do we not inform and educate ignorant minds of the ways that the Internet can be used to further their own knowledge?

The course would need to inform the students of what DH really is, letting them define if for themselves. It would also be important to not scare the students away with too many technical specifics. It would be best to look at this class as an introductory course that would allow a little dip into each pond of knowledge in the field of DH.  Who to be more interested in the flaws of how they are learning than those that are paying money to learn.

We believe that teaching Digital Humanities to undergraduate students is critically important. Today’s college undergrads are part of a unique, new generation.  We have been immersed in this new climate every day, surrounded by the digitization of the world, and yet most students probably know very little about the actual study of Digital Humanities.  It makes scholarly work more attractive. So little is being done to truly integrate technology into new teaching and learning practices.  Teaching Digital Humanities to undergrads can be beneficial because it gives insight into how the onset of technology has changed our world, and how we can change with it. Though learning Digital Humanities does not need, as a goal, to turn its students into scholars, it can prompt them to make their work a little more worthwhile. The whole class collaborates and interacts. EVERYONE’S opinion matters and all inquiries are valid. The study of humanities is truly an art form, and if this practice is not passed on to the next generation, using the new tools that we are accustomed to and can use easily, the art form will be lost.

As we said before, Digital Humanities is about not only learning and accepting the digital ways of our world, but also about how to apply these strategies to our education. From our DH class, we found that DH isn’t just one thing. It’s not a fact or a definition one can memorize. It’s not something that can be understood in 5 minutes- or even 5 weeks. It’s something that is on a completely different level than any other subject or idea. It’s real. It’s relatable. It’s understandable. It’s intellectual. It’s sophisticated. It’s essential. If we could take all of these thoughts and ideas from a course we were so unsure of in the beginning, imagine what college students in the future could glean from Digital Humanities.

Our full story is chronicled on our class blog (stephanieschlitz.com/dh) for all to see. Hopefully, this poses an example for other universities to integrate a course such as this one into their curriculum. Pictures of our collaboration process can be found here. The password is BUhonorsDH

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